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Coral Gables Water Quality Report

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Sources of Coral Gables, Florida Drinking Water

The city of Coral Gables (Miami-Dade County) sole source for drinking water is ground water from wells. The wells feed the Hialeah and John E. Preston, and Alexander Orr regional water treatment plants and the South Dade Water Supply System, which is comprised of five smaller water treatment plants that serve residents south of SW 264th Street in the unincorporated areas of the County.  

Source: Miami-Dade County

A list of contaminants in Coral Gables' Water Supply 

(Detected above health guidelines)

Perfluorinated Chemicals

Perfluorinated chemicals are a group of synthetic compounds used in hundreds of products from nonstick pans to stain-repellent clothing, wire coatings and firefighting foam.

Chromium (hexavalent)   

Chromium (hexavalent) is a carcinogen that commonly contaminates American drinking water. Chromium (hexavalent) in drinking water may be due to industrial pollution or natural occurrences in mineral deposits and groundwater. 

Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs) cancer

Trihalomethanes are cancer-causing contaminants that form during water treatment with chlorine and other disinfectants. The total trihalomethanes group includes four chemicals: chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane and bromoform.

Radiological contaminants  

Radiological contaminants leach into water from certain minerals and from mining. This utility detected Radium, combined (-226 & -228).

Potential health effects of consuming these contaminants

Health risks of Perfluorinated Chemicals in excess of health guideline

Endocrine Disruption | Cancer:  These chemicals have been linked to endocrine disruption, accelerated puberty, liver and immune system damage, thyroid changes, and cancer risk. Sometimes referred to as PFC, PFOA, PFOS, or PFCs.

Health risks of chromium (hexavalent) in excess of health guideline

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.02 ppb for chromium (hexavalent) was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a public health goal, the level of a drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against cancer. 

Health risks of trihalomethanes in excess of health guideline

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.8 ppb for trihalomethanes was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a draft public health goal, the level of drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against cancer.

Health risks of radiological contaminants in excess of health guidelines

Birth defects: Drinking water contamination with radioactive substances increases the risk of cancer and may harm fetal development.

Contaminant Levels in Coral Gables' Water Supply

Perfluorinated Chemicals (Status): 

No national drinking water standard exists. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a member of a group of perfluorinated chemicals used in many consumer products. PFOS and other perfluorinated chemicals can cause serious health effects, including cancer, endocrine disruption, accelerated puberty, liver and immune system damage, and thyroid changes. These chemicals are persistent in the environment and they accumulate in people.

Chromium (hexavalent):

Health Guideline: 0.02 ppb

  • Coral Gables: 0.0857 ppb
  • State: 0.155 ppb
  • National: 0.782 ppb 
Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs):

Health Guidelines: 0.8 ppb

  • State: 23.2 ppb
  • National: 23.4 ppb
  • Coral Gables: 43.5 ppb

Radiological contaminants (Status) : 

No standards or information available about this contaminant but it cannot be good. This utility detected Radium, combined (-226 & -228). Radiological contaminants leach into water from certain minerals and from mining. Drinking water contamination with radioactive substances increases the risk of cancer and may harm fetal development.

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April Jones
Hiker, blogger, clean living enthusiast, water quality expert
      

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