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Great Falls Water Quality Report

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Sources Of Drinking Water in Great Falls, Montana

Where does Great Falls get its water from? The drinking water used by the residents of Great Falls, Malmstrom Air Force Base (MAFB), and Black Eagle is sourced from the Missouri River and treated at our water treatment facility to make it safe to drink. The treatment facility is located just up gradient from the Missouri’s confluence with the Sun River in Great Falls. Is Great Falls water safe to drink?

Source: 2017-Consumer-Confidence-Report

Contaminants Found in Great Falls' Water Supply

(Detected above health guidelines)

Arsenic 

Arsenic is a potent carcinogen and common contaminant in drinking water. Arsenic causes thousands of cases of cancer each year in the U.S.

Bromodichloromethane

Bromodichloromethane, one of the total trihalomethanes (TTHMs), is formed when chlorine or other disinfectants are used to treat drinking water. Bromodichloromethane and other disinfection byproducts increase the risk of cancer and may cause problems during pregnancy.

Chloroform

Chloroform, one of the total trihalomethanes (TTHMs), is formed when chlorine or other disinfectants are used to treat drinking water. Chloroform and other disinfection byproducts increase the risk of cancer and may cause problems during pregnancy.

Chromium (hexavalent)

Chromium (hexavalent) is a carcinogen that commonly contaminates American drinking water. Chromium (hexavalent) in drinking water may be due to industrial pollution or natural occurrences in mineral deposits and groundwater.

Dibromochloromethane

Dibromochloromethane, one of the total trihalomethanes (TTHMs), is formed when chlorine or other disinfectants are used to treat drinking water.

Dichloroacetic acid

Dichloroacetic acid, one of the group of five haloacetic acids regulated by federal standards, is formed when chlorine or other disinfectants are used to treat drinking water. Haloacetic acids and other disinfection byproducts increase the risk of cancer and may cause problems during pregnancy.

Radiological contaminants

This utility detected Radium, combined (-226 & -228)Radium-226 & Uranium.

 
Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs)

Trihalomethanes are cancer-causing contaminants that form during water treatment with chlorine and other disinfectants. The total trihalomethanes group includes four chemicals: chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane and bromoform.

Trichloroacetic acid

Trichloroacetic acid, one of the group of five haloacetic acids regulated by federal standards, is formed when chlorine or other disinfectants are used to treat drinking water. Haloacetic acids and other disinfection byproducts increase the risk of cancer and may cause problems during pregnancy.

Hormones

This utility detected 4-Androstene-3,17-dione. Hormones in drinking water come from human and animal wastewater discharged into drinking water sources. Conventional drinking water treatment does not remove hormones.

Potential Health Effects of Consuming These Contaminants

 Health risks of Arsenic in excess of health guideline

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.004 ppb for arsenic was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a public health goal, the level of a drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against cancer.

Health risks of bromodichloromethane in excess of health guideline

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.4 ppb for bromodichloromethane was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a one-in-a-million lifetime risk of cancer. Values greater than one-in-a-million cancer risk level can result in increased cancer cases above one in a million people.

Health risks of chloroform in excess of health guideline

Cancer: The health guideline of 1 ppb for chloroform was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a one-in-a-million lifetime risk of cancer. Values greater than one-in-a-million cancer risk level can result in increased cancer cases above one in a million people.

Health risks of chromium (hexavalent) in excess of health guideline

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.02 ppb for chromium (hexavalent) was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a public health goal, the level of a drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against cancer.

Health risks of dichloroacetic acid in excess of health guideline

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.7 ppb for dichloroacetic acid was defined by the Environmental Protection Agency as a one-in-a-million lifetime risk of cancer. Values greater than one-in-a-million cancer risk level can result in increased cancer cases above one in a million people.

Health risks of dibromochloromethane  in excess of health guidelines

Cancer & Birth Defects: Dibromochloromethane and other disinfection byproducts increase the risk of cancer and may cause problems during pregnancy.

Radiological contaminants

Cancer:  Radiological contaminants leach into water from certain minerals and from mining. Drinking water contamination with radioactive substances increases the risk of cancer and may harm fetal development.

Health risks of total trihalomethanes in excess of health guideline

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.8 ppb for trihalomethanes was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a draft public health goal, the level of drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against cancer.

Health risks of trichloroacetic acid in excess of health guideline

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.5 ppb for trichloroacetic acid was defined by the Environmental Protection Agency as a one-in-a-million lifetime risk of cancer. Values greater than one-in-a-million cancer risk level can result in increased cancer cases above one in a million people.

Health risks of hormones in excess of health guideline

Cancer: This utility detected 4-Androstene-3,17-dioneHormones in drinking water come from human and animal wastewater discharged into drinking water sources. Conventional drinking water treatment does not remove hormones.

Contaminant Levels in Great Falls Compared to Other Regions

 Arsenic

 - Health Guideline: 0.004 ppb

- National: 1.30 ppb

 - State: 1.67 ppb

Great Falls, MT: 1.000 ppb  

Bromodichloromethane

 - Health Guideline: 0.06 ppb

 - State: 3.29 ppb

 - National: 4.38 ppb

 - Great Falls, MT: 10.4 ppb

Chloroform

 - Health Guideline: 0.4 ppb

 - State: 9.23 ppb

 - National: 11.5 ppb

 - Great Falls, MT: 28.0 ppb

Chromium (hexavalent)

 - Health Guideline: 0.02 ppb

- Great Falls, MT: 0.0319 ppb

- State: 0.135 ppb

- National: 0.782 ppb

Dibromochloromethane 

 - Health Guideline: 0.1 ppb

 - State: 1.47 ppb

 - Great Falls, MT: 1.71 ppb  

 - National: 3.01 ppb

Dichloroacetic acid

 - Health Guideline: 0.7 ppb

- National: 6.07 ppb

 - State: 7.09 ppb

- Great Falls, MT: 15.5 ppb   

Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs)

 - Health Guideline: 0.8 ppb

 - State: 15.0 ppb

 - National: 23.7 ppb

 - Great Falls, MT: 40.2 ppb

Trichloroacetic acid

 - Health Guideline: 0.5 ppb

   - National: 4.96 ppb

- State: 7.79 ppb

 - Great Falls, MT:  21.8 ppb

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Jason Nash

A hiker, blogger, and water quality expert...

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