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Carmel, Indiana Water Quality Report

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Sources Of Drinking Water in Carmel, Indiana

Where does Carmel get its water from? Carmel’s water supply comes from a ground water source called an aquifer. The aquifer is commonly referred to as the Upper White River Basin Watershed. Eighteen wells located throughout the city pump water from the aquifer to five water plants for treatment. The production wells range in depth from 49 to 108 feet deep, are 10 to 36 inches in diameter, and have pumping capacities ranging from 175 to 2,800 gallons per minute. White River supplies two of the four surface water treatment plants: White River and White River North. Morse Reservoir, near Noblesville, stores water to assure a dependable supply in the White River to these plants. Fall Creek is another surface water supply. 

Geist Reservoir stores water to assure and adequate supply in Fall Creek for the Fall Creek Treatment Plant. A number of wells are used intermittently to supplement the supplies to the White River, White River North, and Fall Creek plants. Citizens Water also receives some surface water from Eagle Creek Reservoir which supplies water to the T.W. Moses plant. Currently Citizens Water has five groundwater stations that serve smaller portions of its service area. These are White River North, Geist Station, Harding Station, South Well Field, and Ford Road Plant. These groundwater stations treat water pumped from underground water sources called aquifers.  Does Carmel add fluoride to their water? Yes, fluoride (A known neurotoxin) is also added to the water to prevent tooth decay. Is Carmel's water safe to drink?

Source: City of Carmel

Contaminants Found in Carmel's Water Supply

(Detected above health guidelines)

Antimony 

Antimony is a metal found in natural deposits as ores containing other elements. The most widely used antimony compound is antimony trioxide, used as a flame retardant. It is also found in batteries, pigments, and ceramics/glass. Antimony is a naturally occurring metal that enters tap water from plumbing fittings and also from industrial uses.  Antimony causes organ damage and shortens lifespans in studies of laboratory animals.

Arsenic

The health guideline of 0.0007 ppb for 1,2,3-trichloropropane was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a public health goal, the level of a drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against cancer.

Bromodichloromethane

Bromodichloromethane, one of the total trihalomethanes (TTHMs), is formed when chlorine or other disinfectants are used to treat drinking water. Bromodichloromethane and other disinfection byproducts increase the risk of cancer and may cause problems during pregnancy.

Bromoform

Bromoform, one of the total trihalomethanes (TTHMs), is formed when chlorine or other disinfectants are used to treat drinking water. Bromoform and other disinfection byproducts increase the risk of cancer and may cause problems during pregnancy.

Chloroform

Chloroform, one of the total trihalomethanes (TTHMs), is formed when chlorine or other disinfectants are used to treat drinking water. Chloroform and other disinfection byproducts increase the risk of cancer and may cause problems during pregnancy.

Dibromochloromethane

Dibromochloromethane, one of the total trihalomethanes (TTHMs), is formed when chlorine or other disinfectants are used to treat drinking water.

Radiological contaminants  

Radiological contaminants leach into water from certain minerals and from mining. This utility detected Radium, combined (-226 & -228).

Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs)

Trihalomethanes are cancer-causing contaminants that form during water treatment with chlorine and other disinfectants. The total trihalomethanes group includes four chemicals: chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane and bromoform.

Fluoride

Fluoride occurs naturally in surface and groundwater and is also added to drinking water by many water systems. The fluoride that is added to water is not the naturally occurring kind, the main chemicals used to fluoridate drinking water are known as “silicofluorides” (i.e., hydrofluorosilicic acid and sodium fluorosilicate). Silicofluorides are not pharmaceutical-grade fluoride products; they are unprocessed industrial by-products of the phosphate fertilizer industry (Gross!). Since these silicofluorides undergo no purification procedures, they can contain elevated levels of arsenic — moreso than any other water treatment chemical. In addition, recent research suggests that the addition of silicofluorides to water is a risk factor for elevated lead exposure, particularly among residents who live in homes with old pipes.

Potential Health Effects of Consuming These Contaminants

Health risks of Antimony above health recommendations

Organ Damage: The health guideline of 1 ppb for antimony was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a public health goal, the level of a drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against change to the stomach and intestines.

Health risks of Arsenic above health recommendations

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.004 ppb for arsenic was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a public health goal, the level of a drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against cancer.

Health risks of Bromodichloromethane above health recommendations 

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.4 ppb for bromodichloromethane was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a one-in-a-million lifetime risk of cancer. Values greater than one-in-a-million cancer risk level can result in increased cancer cases above one in a million people.

Health risks of Bromoform in excess of health guideline

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.5 ppb for bromoform was proposed in 2018 by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a one-in-a-million lifetime risk of cancer. Values greater than one-in-a-million cancer risk level can result in increased cancer cases above one in a million people.

Health risks of Chloroform above health recommendations 

Cancer: The health guideline of 1 ppb for chloroform was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a one-in-a-million lifetime risk of cancer. Values greater than one-in-a-million cancer risk level can result in increased cancer cases above one in a million people.

Health risks of Dibromochloromethane above health recommendations

Cancer & Pregnancy: Dibromochloromethane, one of the total trihalomethanes (TTHMs), is formed when chlorine or other disinfectants are used to treat drinking water. Dibromochloromethane and other disinfection byproducts increase the risk of cancer and may cause problems during pregnancy

Health risks of Trihalomethanes above health recommendations 

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.8 ppb for trihalomethanes was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a draft public health goal, the level of drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against cancer.

Health risks of Radiological contaminants above health recommendations

Birth defects: Drinking water contamination with radioactive substances increases the risk of cancer and may harm fetal development.

Contaminant Levels in Carmel, IN Compared to Other Regions

Antimony

 - Health Guideline: 1.0 ppb

 - Carmel, IN: 2.30 ppb

 - National: 0.0291 ppb

Arsenic

 - Health Guideline: 0.004 ppb

 - Carmel, IN: 1.70 ppb

 - National: 1.30 ppb

Bromodichloromethane

- Health Guideline: 0.06 ppb

 - Carmel, IN: 8.10 ppb

 - National: 4.38 ppb

Bromoform

- Health Guideline: 0.5 ppb

 - Carmel, IN: 1.80 ppb

 - National: 1.77 ppb

Chloroform

 - Health Guideline: 1.0 ppb

 - National: 11.4 ppb

 - Carmel, IN: 5.60 ppb

Dibromochloromethane 

 - Health Guideline: 0.1 ppb

 - National: 2.99 ppb

 - Carmel, IN: 6.70 ppb

Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs)

 - Health Guideline: 0.8 ppb

 - National: 23.4 ppb

 - Carmel, IN: 18.5 ppb

Radiological contaminants  

No information available about this contaminant but it cannot be good. This utility detected Radium, combined (-226 & -228) & Uranium. Radiological contaminants leach into water from certain minerals and from mining. Drinking water contamination with radioactive substances increases the risk of cancer and may harm fetal development.

Fluoride

 - Legal Limit: 4 ppb

 - National: 0.440 ppb

 - Carmel, IN: 1.12 ppb

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April Jones

A hiker, blogger, and water quality expert...

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