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Henderson, Nevada Water Quality Report

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Sources Of Drinking Water in Henderson, Nevada

Southern Nevada receives approximately 90% of its drinking water from the Colorado River, via Lake Mead. The river is one of the highest quality and cleanest water sources available in the world, originating as snow fall on the western slopes of the Colorado Rocky Mountains. The remaining 10% of our drinking water is derived from groundwater sources, or wells, located throughout the Las Vegas valley. Because our water originates in the mountains and must travel through rocky substrate to form the Colorado River, there is a relatively higher concentration of naturally occurring minerals making the water "hard". Hardness in drinking water is caused by two minerals in the Colorado River system - calcium and magnesium. It is called "hardness" because the minerals make it "hard" to form a lather or suds for washing. The City of Henderson treats and provides approximately 15% of the city's drinking water by our own Water Treatment Plant, with a capacity up to 15 million gallons per day. The other 85% is supplied by the Southern Nevada Water Authority, of which the City of Henderson is a member agency. The City is responsible for all drinking water distribution to Henderson residents and businesses.

Reclaimed water is wastewater that has been cleaned and highly treated to a level that is safe for use in irrigation, industrial coolant, dust control or in water features. While not intended for drinking water, the water is proven safe for plants, and even human contact in irrigated areas like parks, playing fields, construction sites and golf courses. By using this water for irrigation, we can preserve and enhance our precious drinking water supply and our environment.

The City uses reclaimed water primarily as irrigation for golf courses, a cemetery, and Boulder Highway medians. Reclaimed water also supplies the nine ponds that support the Henderson Bird Viewing Preserve. The City annually reuses approximately 34% of our reclaimed water for these purposes.

Reclaimed water that is not used for the above purposes is returned to the Colorado River system and earns return flow credits. That means for every gallon of reclaimed water we return to the system, we are able to take an equal amount of drinking water back out for use by the Henderson community. Reclaimed water is an essential component to ensuring our community's future water resources.

Contaminants Found in the Henderson's Water Supply

(Detected above health guidelines)

Arsenic

The health guideline of 0.0007 ppb for 1,2,3-trichloropropane was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a public health goal, the level of a drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against cancer.

Bromodichloromethane

Bromodichloromethane, one of the total trihalomethanes (TTHMs), is formed when chlorine or other disinfectants are used to treat drinking water. Bromodichloromethane and other disinfection byproducts increase the risk of cancer and may cause problems during pregnancy.

Bromoform

Bromoform, one of the total trihalomethanes (TTHMs), is formed when chlorine or other disinfectants are used to treat drinking water. Bromoform and other disinfection byproducts increase the risk of cancer and may cause problems during pregnancy.

Chloroform

Chloroform, one of the total trihalomethanes (TTHMs), is formed when chlorine or other disinfectants are used to treat drinking water. Chloroform and other disinfection byproducts increase the risk of cancer and may cause problems during pregnancy.

Chromium (hexavalent)

Chromium (hexavalent) is a carcinogen that commonly contaminates American drinking water. Chromium (hexavalent) in drinking water may be due to industrial pollution or natural occurrences in mineral deposits and groundwater. Read more about chromium (hexavalent).

Dibromochloromethane

Dibromochloromethane, one of the total trihalomethanes (TTHMs), is formed when chlorine or other disinfectants are used to treat drinking water. Dibromochloromethane and other disinfection byproducts increase the risk of cancer and may cause problems during pregnancy.

Dichloroacetic acid

Dichloroacetic acid, one of the group of five haloacetic acids regulated by federal standards, is formed when chlorine or other disinfectants are used to treat drinking water. Haloacetic acids and other disinfection byproducts increase the risk of cancer and may cause problems during pregnancy.

Radiological contaminants

This utility detected Radium, combined (-226 & -228), Radium-226, Radium-228 & Uranium.

Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs)

Trihalomethanes are cancer-causing contaminants that form during water treatment with chlorine and other disinfectants. The total trihalomethanes group includes four chemicals: chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane and bromoform.

Trichloroacetic acid

Trichloroacetic acid, one of the group of five haloacetic acids regulated by federal standards, is formed when chlorine or other disinfectants are used to treat drinking water. Haloacetic acids and other disinfection byproducts increase the risk of cancer and may cause problems during pregnancy.

Fluoride

Fluoride occurs naturally in surface and groundwater and is also added to drinking water by many water systems. The fluoride that is added to water is not the naturally occurring kind, the main chemicals used to fluoridate drinking water are known as “silicofluorides” (i.e., hydrofluorosilicic acid and sodium fluorosilicate). Silicofluorides are not pharmaceutical-grade fluoride products; they are unprocessed industrial by-products of the phosphate fertilizer industry (Gross!). Since these silicofluorides undergo no purification procedures, they can contain elevated levels of arsenic — moreso than any other water treatment chemical. In addition, recent research suggests that the addition of silicofluorides to water is a risk factor for elevated lead exposure, particularly among residents who live in homes with old pipes.

Potential Health Effects of Consuming These Contaminants

Health risks of arsenic in excess of health guideline 

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.004 ppb for arsenic was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a public health goal, the level of a drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against cancer.

Health risks of bromodichloromethane in excess of health guideline 

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.4 ppb for bromodichloromethane was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a one-in-a-million lifetime risk of cancer. Values greater than one-in-a-million cancer risk level can result in increased cancer cases above one in a million people.

Health risks of bromoform in excess of health guideline 

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.5 ppb for bromoform was proposed in 2018 by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a one-in-a-million lifetime risk of cancer. Values greater than one-in-a-million cancer risk level can result in increased cancer cases above one in a million people.

Health risks of chloroform in excess of health guideline 

Cancer: The health guideline of 1 ppb for chloroform was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a one-in-a-million lifetime risk of cancer. Values greater than one-in-a-million cancer risk level can result in increased cancer cases above one in a million people.

Health risks of chromium (hexavalent) in excess of the health guidelines

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.02 ppb for chromium (hexavalent) was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a public health goal, the level of a drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against cancer.

Health risks of dibromochloromethane in excess of health guideline 

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.7 ppb for dibromochloromethane was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a one-in-a-million lifetime risk of cancer. Values greater than one-in-a-million cancer risk level can result in increased cancer cases above one in a million people.

Health risks of dichloroacetic acid in excess of health guideline 

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.7 ppb for dichloroacetic acid was defined by the Environmental Protection Agency as a one-in-a-million lifetime risk of cancer. Values greater than one-in-a-million cancer risk level can result in increased cancer cases above one in a million people.

Health risks of radiological contaminants in excess of the health guidelines

Cancer: Radiological contaminants leach into water from certain minerals and from mining. Drinking water contamination with radioactive substances increases the risk of cancer and may harm fetal development.

Health risks of trihalomethanes in excess of health guideline 

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.8 ppb for trihalomethanes was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a draft public health goal, the level of drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against cancer.

Health risks of trichloroacetic acid in excess of health guideline 

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.5 ppb for trichloroacetic acid was defined by the Environmental Protection Agency as a one-in-a-million lifetime risk of cancer. Values greater than one-in-a-million cancer risk level can result in increased cancer cases above one in a million people.

Health risks of hormones in excess of health guideline 

Hormones in drinking water come from human and animal wastewater discharged into drinking water sources. Conventional drinking water treatment does not remove hormones. 

Contaminant Levels in Henderson, NV Tap Water Compared to Other Regions

Arsenic

- Legal Limit: 0.004 ppb

 - State: 4.95 ppb

 - National: 1.30 ppb

 - Henderson, NV: 1.65 ppb

Bromodichloromethane

 - Health Guideline: 0.4 ppb

 - State: 1.92 ppb

 - National: 4.37 ppb

 - Henderson, NV: 20.0 ppb

Bromoform

 - Health Guideline: 0.4 ppb

 - State: 1.30 ppb

 - National: 1.77 ppb

 - Henderson, NV: 2.75 ppb

Chloroform

 - Health Guideline: 1.0 ppb

 - State: 3.07 ppb

 - National: 11.4 ppb

 - Henderson, NV: 24.0 ppb

Chromium (hexavalent)

 - Health Guideline: 0.02 ppb

 - Henderson, NV: 0.0571 ppb

 - State: 0.640 ppb

 - National: 0.782 ppb

Dibromochloromethane

 - Health Guideline: 0.7 ppb

 - State: 1.82 ppb

 - National: 2.99 ppb

 - Henderson, NV: 14.8 ppb

Dichloroacetic acid

 - Health Guideline: 0.7 ppb

 - State: 1.61 ppb

 - National: 6.00 ppb

 - Henderson, NV: 8.62 ppb

Radiological Contaminants

 - No standard exist for this contaminant (yikes!) This utility detected Radium, combined (-226 & -228), Radium-226, Radium-228, Strontium-90 & Uranium.

Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs)

 - Health Guideline: 0.8 ppb

 - State: 9.5 ppb

 - National: 23.4 ppb

 - Henderson, NV: 61.6ppb

Trichloroacetic acid

 - Health Guideline: 0.5 ppb

 - State: 1.29 ppb

 - National: 4.93 ppb

 - Henderson, NV: 4.77 ppb

Fluoride

- Legal Limit: 4 ppb

 - State: 0.331 ppb

 - National: 0.440 ppb

 - Henderson, NV: 0.711 ppb

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April Jones

A hiker, blogger, and water quality expert...

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