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New Haven, CT Water Quality Report

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Sources Of Drinking Water in New Haven, Connecticut

Where does New Haven's water come from? Ten lakes and three aquifers are the source of your water. The lakes are filled by rivers. Aquifers are natural sand, gravel and bedrock areas below the surface of the ground that are saturated with water, typically from rainfall. Over 80 percent of the tap water in the South Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority's water district comes from lakes located in Hamden, Woodbridge, East Haven, Bethany, Guilford, Madison, Killingworth, Branford and North Branford, while the balance of the tap water comes from the Quinnipiac and Mill River aquifers located in Cheshire and Hamden, as well as the Housatonic River aquifer in Derby and Seymour. 

South Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority's distribution system is interconnected. Water from two or more sources may be delivered to some neighborhoods. This blending of water not only permits South Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority to meet your water demands, especially during a heat wave, but readily ensures that water is available to fight a fire or other emergency. Is New Haven's water safe to drink? Does New Haven put fluoride in the water? 

Source: City of New Haven, Connecticut

Contaminants Found in New Haven's Water Supply

(Detected above health guidelines)

Bromodichloromethane

Bromodichloromethane, one of the total trihalomethanes (TTHMs), is formed when chlorine or other disinfectants are used to treat drinking water. Bromodichloromethane and other disinfection byproducts increase the risk of cancer and may cause problems during pregnancy.

Chloroform

Chloroform, one of the total trihalomethanes (TTHMs), is formed when chlorine or other disinfectants are used to treat drinking water. Chloroform and other disinfection byproducts increase the risk of cancer and may cause problems during pregnancy.

Chromium (hexavalent)

Chromium (hexavalent) is a carcinogen that commonly contaminates American drinking water. Chromium (hexavalent) in drinking water may be due to industrial pollution or natural occurrences in mineral deposits and groundwater.

Dibromochloromethane

Dibromochloromethane, one of the total trihalomethanes (TTHMs), is formed when chlorine or other disinfectants are used to treat drinking water.

Radiological contaminants   

This utility detected Radium, combined (-226 & -228), Radium-226, Radium-228. Radiological contaminants leach into water from certain minerals and from mining. Drinking water contamination with radioactive substances increases the risk of cancer and may harm fetal development.

Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs)

Trihalomethanes are cancer-causing contaminants that form during water treatment with chlorine and other disinfectants. The total trihalomethanes group includes four chemicals: chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane and bromoform. 

Fluoride

Fluoride occurs naturally in surface and groundwater and is also added to drinking water by many water systems. The fluoride that is added to water is not the naturally occurring kind, the main chemicals used to fluoridate drinking water are known as “silicofluorides” (i.e., hydrofluorosilicic acid and sodium fluorosilicate). Silicofluorides are not pharmaceutical-grade fluoride products; they are unprocessed industrial by-products of the phosphate fertilizer industry (Gross!). Since these silicofluorides undergo no purification procedures, they can contain elevated levels of arsenic — moreso than any other water treatment chemical. In addition, recent research suggests that the addition of silicofluorides to water is a risk factor for elevated lead exposure, particularly among residents who live in homes with old pipes.

Potential Health Effects of Consuming These Contaminants

Health risks of bromodichloromethane in excess of health guideline

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.4 ppb for bromodichloromethane was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a one-in-a-million lifetime risk of cancer. Values greater than one-in-a-million cancer risk level can result in increased cancer cases above one in a million people.

Health risks of chloroform in excess of health guideline

Cancer: The health guideline of 1 ppb for chloroform was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a one-in-a-million lifetime risk of cancer. Values greater than one-in-a-million cancer risk level can result in increased cancer cases above one in a million people.

Health risks of chromium (hexavalent) in excess of health guideline

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.02 ppb for chromium (hexavalent) was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a public health goal, the level of a drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against cancer.

Health risks of radiological contaminants in excess of health guidelines

Birth defects: Drinking water contamination with radioactive substances increases the risk of cancer and may harm fetal development.

Health risks of trihalomethanes in excess of health guideline

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.8 ppb for trihalomethanes was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a draft public health goal, the level of drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against cancer.

Health risks of dibromochloromethane  in excess of health guidelines

Cancer & Birth Defects: Dibromochloromethane and other disinfection byproducts increase the risk of cancer and may cause problems during pregnancy.

Contaminant Levels in New Haven, CT Compared to Other Regions

Bromodichloromethane

- Health Guideline: 0.06 ppb

 - State: 2.00 ppb

 - New Haven, CT: 4.97 ppb

 - National: 4.38 ppb

Chloroform

 - Health Guideline: 1.0 ppb

 - State: 6.93 ppb

 - National: 11.4 ppb

 - New Haven, CT: 26.0 ppb

Chromium (hexavalent)

 - Health Guideline: 0.02 ppb

 - New Haven, CT: 0.237 ppb

 - State: 0.144 ppb

 - National: 0.782 ppb

Dibromochloromethane  

 - Health Guideline: 0.1 ppb

 - State: 0.992 ppb

 - National: 3.01 ppb

 - New Haven, CT: 0.583 ppb

Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs)

 - Health Guideline: 0.8 ppb

 - State: 19.4 ppb

 - National: 23.4 ppb

 - New Haven, CT: 37.8 ppb

Radiological contaminants  

No information available about this contaminant but it cannot be good. This utility detected Radium, combined (-226 & -228). Radiological contaminants leach into water from certain minerals and from mining. Drinking water contamination with radioactive substances increases the risk of cancer and may harm fetal development.

 

Fluoride

 - Health Guideline: None

 - State: 0.189 ppb

 - National: 23.4 ppb

 - New Haven, CT: 0.390 ppb

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April Jones

A colorado based hiker, blogger, and water quality expert...

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