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Newark, NJ Water Quality Report

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Sources Of Drinking Water in Newark, New Jersey

Where does Newark get its water from? Newark’s water supply has long been a most valuable asset.  The Department of Water and Sewer Utilities remains committed to protecting its vast assets and investments by insuring, maintaining and safeguarding the integrity of our water infrastructure and distribution system, which includes 500 miles of distribution mains and pipeline, varying in size from 4-inch to 60-inch diameter;  5,092 hydrants; 9,926 control valves; 80 miles of transmission aqueducts, structures and right of ways through 3 counties and 23 municipalities; Pequannock Watershed; Pequannock Water Treatment Plant; five reservoirs with nine dams; six outlet structures and 64 square miles of woodland

Similarly, the Department is dedicated to maintaining our sewer infrastructure and collection system, which includes 420 miles of collection mains of which 50% is vitrified clay and 20% is brick, varying in size from 8-inch to 120-inch diameter; over 7,600 catch basins; 17 combined sewer overflow structures with seven (7) netting facilities and six (6) screening facilities; two (2) storm water pumping stations; five (5) storm water drainage outfalls; and the South-Side Interceptor, a four (4) mile trunk sewer main that transports the wastewater from the southern part of the City directly to the treatment plant. Is Newark's water safe to drink?

Source: City of Newark, NJ

Contaminants Found in Newark's Water Supply

(Detected above health guidelines)

Chromium (hexavalent)

Chromium (hexavalent) is a carcinogen that commonly contaminates American drinking water. Chromium (hexavalent) in drinking water may be due to industrial pollution or natural occurrences in mineral deposits and groundwater.

Hormones 

This utility detected 4-Androstene-3,17-dione. Hormones in drinking water come from human and animal wastewater discharged into drinking water sources. Conventional drinking water treatment does not remove hormones.

Potential Health Effects of Consuming These Contaminants

Health risks of chromium (hexavalent) in excess of health guideline

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.02 ppb for chromium (hexavalent) was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a public health goal, the level of a drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against cancer.

Health risks of hormones in excess of health guideline

Endocrine Disruption: Hormones in drinking water come from human and animal wastewater discharged into drinking water sources. Conventional drinking water treatment does not remove hormones.

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Contaminant Levels in Newark, NJ Compared to Other Regions

Chromium (hexavalent)

 - Health Guideline: 0.02 ppb

 - Newark, NJ: 0.0419 ppb

 - State: 0.153 ppb

 - National: 0.782 ppb

Hormones

No drinking water standards exist for these contaminants which cannot be good (Yikes). This utility detected 4-Androstene-3,17-dione.

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April Jones

A hiker, blogger, and water quality expert...

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