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Beaverton, OR Water Quality Report

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Sources Of Drinking Water in Beaverton, Oregon

Where does Beaverton get its water from? The primary source of filtered drinking water in Beaverton’s service area is the Joint Water Commission (JWC) Opens a New Window. Water Treatment Plant located south of Forest Grove. The water treatment plant filters surface water pumped from the nearby upper Tualatin River. The water treatment plant can produce up to 75 million gallons a day (mgd) of finished drinking water. The City owns a 25% share in the water treatment plant, allowing the City up to 18.75 mgd of treated water. 

During the summer, when drinking water demand is high and Tualatin River streamflow is low, water is released from Hagg Lake (Scoggins Reservoir) and Barney Reservoir (formed behind a dam on the Trask River in the Coast Range). The water spilled from the two dams is to compensate for the amount removed from the Tualatin River for Beaverton’s summer use. Water released from Barney Reservoir is diverted by pipes from the Trask River basin into the upper Tualatin River.

The City of Beaverton owns yearly water rights of up to 1.3 billion gallons (4,000 acre-feet) in Scoggins Reservoir and 1.4 billion gallons (4,300 acre-feet) in Barney Reservoir. Water originating from Scoggins Reservoir and Barney Reservoir is the source of most of the City’s raw water (before treatment) during the summer. Release of stored raw water from the two dams increases summertime streamflow in the Tualatin River, helping to sustain a healthy river ecosystem. Every winter and spring, the City uses its 16 mgd natural streamflow water right to meet daily water supply demands. Surface water from the Tualatin River is filtered in the JWC Water Treatment Plant before delivery to the City of Beaverton. Is Beaverton's water safe to drink?

Source: City of Beaverton

Contaminants Found in Beaverton's Water Supply

(Detected above health guidelines)

Chromium (hexavalent)

Chromium (hexavalent) is a carcinogen that commonly contaminates American drinking water. Chromium (hexavalent) in drinking water may be due to industrial pollution or natural occurrences in mineral deposits and groundwater. Read more about chromium (hexavalent).

Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs)

Trihalomethanes are cancer-causing contaminants that form during water treatment with chlorine and other disinfectants. The total trihalomethanes group includes four chemicals: chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane and bromoform. 

Potential Health Effects of Consuming These Contaminants

Health risks of Chromium (hexavalent) in excess of the health guidelines

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.02 ppb for chromium (hexavalent) was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a public health goal, the level of a drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against cancer.

Health risks of Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs) in excess of the health guidelines 

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.8 ppb for trihalomethanes was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a draft public health goal, the level of drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against cancer.

Contaminant Levels Compared to Other Regions

Chromium (hexavalent)

 - Health Guideline: 0.02 ppb

 - National: 0.782 ppb

 - State: 0.236 ppb

 - Beaverton, OR: 0.237 ppb

Total Trihalomethanes (TTHMs)

 - Health Guideline: 0.8 ppb

 - State: 22.9 ppb

 - National: 23.4 ppb

 - Beaverton, OR: 35.6 ppb

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April Jones

A hiker, blogger, and water quality expert...

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