Industry-Leading Lifetime Warranty     : : : FREE EXPEDITED SHIPPING in US, UK, & SG : : :     Hassle-Free Returns

Glendale, AZ Water Quality Report

RSS

Sources Of Drinking Water in Glendale, Arizona

Where does Glendale get its water from? The city has five sources of water: Salt River Project, Central Arizona Water Conservation District, groundwater, effluent/reclaimed water and stored water credits. Is Glendale's water safe to drink?

Salt River Project (SRP): SRP surface water supply comes from the Salt and Verde River systems. The water from the Salt and Verde rivers originates from the springtime melt of the snow pack and from monsoon rains originating in northeastern and central Arizona. This water is stored in a series of reservoirs and is delivered to the city’s treatment plant via the Salt River Project’s canal system. Water supplies received from Salt River Project can only be used on lands within the Project’s service area boundaries.

Central Arizona Water Conservation District: The city is entitled to several sources of Colorado River water delivered by the Central Arizona Water Conservation District, of which the largest supply is Central Arizona Project water. During normal, non-drought years, the city would be entitled to receive a total of 22,732 acre-feet from the Colorado River.

City Groundwater: Groundwater availability is not typically affected by drought. Glendale has the right to utilize a limited amount of groundwater, which is pumped from wells connected to either a treatment facility or directly to the city’s water system. The city received a one-time volume of 294,300 acre-feet of groundwater that could be used over a 100-year period starting in 1998 (some of this groundwater has already been used). This limited amount of groundwater may be pumped out of the aquifer without being replenished. In addition to groundwater, the city receives an annual credit for incidental recharge equal to 4.69 percent of total water demand.

Effluent/Reclaimed Water: The newest type of water developed by Glendale is effluent/reclaimed water. Reclaimed water is water previously used that has gone through the wastewater treatment process and is made safe to use again. Reclaimed water is being used directly on landscaping (such as at Arrowhead Ranch) and being stored in the aquifer.

Direct use of reclaimed water benefits the city by fulfilling a water demand that would otherwise be met using potable water. The normal rate of direct use of reclaimed water is usually needed even during droughts because of the lack of underground aquifer storage facilities.

Other Stored Water Credits: The city also acquires stored water credits through various groundwater recharge facilities, and by extinguishing old groundwater rights. The city has recharged more than 101,000 acre-feet of water underground for future use. Additionally, the city has developed more than 44,000 acre-feet of stored water credits by extinguishing agricultural groundwater irrigation rights as those lands urbanize. These credits are one-time credits that are not subject to droughts. Stored water credits can be recovered through wells.

 

Source: City of Glendale

Contaminants Found in Glendale's Water Supply

(Detected above health guidelines)

Arsenic

Arsenic is a potent carcinogen and common contaminant in drinking water. Arsenic causes thousands of cases of cancer each year in the U.S. Click here to read more about arsenic.

Chromium (hexavalent)

Chromium (hexavalent) is a carcinogen that commonly contaminates American drinking water. Chromium (hexavalent) in drinking water may be due to industrial pollution or natural occurrences in mineral deposits and groundwater. Read more about chromium (hexavalent).

Radiological contaminants

This utility detected Radon, Radium, combined (-226 & -228), Radium-226 & Uranium. Radiological contaminants leach into water from certain minerals and from mining. Drinking water contamination with radioactive substances increases the risk of cancer and may harm fetal development.

Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs)

Trihalomethanes are cancer-causing contaminants that form during water treatment with chlorine and other disinfectants. The total trihalomethanes group includes four chemicals: chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane and bromoform. 

Fluoride

Fluoride occurs naturally in surface and groundwater and is also added to drinking water by many water systems. The fluoride that is added to water is not the naturally occurring kind, the main chemicals used to fluoridate drinking water are known as “silicofluorides” (i.e., hydrofluorosilicic acid and sodium fluorosilicate). Silicofluorides are not pharmaceutical-grade fluoride products; they are unprocessed industrial by-products of the phosphate fertilizer industry (Gross!). Since these silicofluorides undergo no purification procedures, they can contain elevated levels of arsenic — more so than any other water treatment chemical. In addition, recent research suggests that the addition of silicofluorides to water is a risk factor for elevated lead exposure, particularly among residents who live in homes with old pipes.

Potential Health Effects of Consuming These Contaminants

Health risks of Arsenic in excess of the health guidelines

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.004 ppb for arsenic was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a public health goal, the level of a drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against cancer. 

Health risks of Chromium (hexavalent) in excess of the health guidelines

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.02 ppb for chromium (hexavalent) was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a public health goal, the level of a drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against cancer.

Health risks of Radiological contaminants in excess of the health guidelines

Cancer: No standard exist for this contaminant. This utility detected Radon, Radium, combined (-226 & -228), Radium-226 & Uranium. Radiological contaminants leach into water from certain minerals and from mining. Drinking water contamination with radioactive substances increases the risk of cancer and may harm fetal development.

Health risks of Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs) in excess of the health guidelines 

Cancer: The health guideline of 0.8 ppb for trihalomethanes was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a draft public health goal, the level of drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against cancer.

Health risks of fluoride in excess of health guideline  

No standards exist for fluoride in water but fluoride is considered by many to be a neurotoxin.

Contaminant Levels Compared to Other Regions

Arsenic

 - Health Guideline: 0.004 ppb

 - National: 1.33 ppb

 - State: 5.02 ppb

 - Glendale, AZ: 2.55 ppb

Chromium (hexavalent)

 - Health Guideline: 0.02 ppb

 - National: 0.782 ppb

 - State: 4.69 ppb

 - Glendale, AZ: 6.44 ppb

Radiological Contaminants

 - No standard exists for this contaminant which cannot be good.

Total Trihalomethanes (TTHMs)

 - Health Guideline: 0.8 ppb

 - State: 13.6 ppb

 - National: 23.4 ppb

 - Glendale, AZ: 42.0 ppb

Fluoride

- Legal Limit: 4 ppb

 - State: 0.776 ppb

 - National: 0.440 ppb

 - Glendale, AZ: 0.270 ppb

Epic Pure Pitcher

April Jones

A hiker, blogger, and water quality expert...

Previous Post Next Post

  • April Jones